The Dram Shop

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By in DIY, Remodel 0

DIY: Sandwich Board on a Budget

So we needed a sidewalk sign for in front of our shop in order to let people know where we are and that we’re open for business. Luckily, John Geurts from McNelis Architects was excited about making a drawing for us to work off of.

We decided to use some of the same materials that we had used on the interior of the shop in order to tie things together. After getting our powder coated schedule 40 pipe, Kee Klamp fittings, and and rotating castors, we were ready to put it all together. The great thing about Kee Klamp is that all you need is an allen wrench.

Here’s what the frame looked like:

Bare bones frame

Bare bones frame

Next we fastened ‘nailer boards’ to the frame via rotating Kee Klamp tabs. These will be used to fasten the boards that will make up the face of the sign. And yes, that’s our garage.

Speaking of which, it was time to find the wood to use for said face of the sign. We chose some reclaimed tongue and groove boards from Home Resource, our local reused construction materials store, and cut them to length on the chop saw.

You can see that the tongue and groove look a little rough on the edges of these boards. They would need to be ripped off on the table saw. Here’s a shot of them halfway milled. You can see that some grooves are still present.

After taking off all of the tongue and Groove we eased the edges of the boards by ripping a ¼” 45 degree angle along the edges. This would offer some relief on the face of the sign and match up well with some of the detail on the interior of the shop.

Now it was time to break out the stain and put a nice coat on the boards…

After everything was dry we attached the boards to the nailers on the sign via stainless bolts. Everything on the sign is either stainless, aluminum, or galvanized to avoid rust as the sign will be outdoors most of the time! We’re getting close!

Next we had two of our logo laser cut out of aluminum by Pro Construction Services here in Missoula. We drilled holes through the aluminum so we could bolt it onto the wooden slats that make up the face of the sign.

We affixed an aluminum logo to each side of the sign, and we’re finally done! We now have an attractive sidewalk sign, that is heavy enough to resist high winds, and can be moved around on casters.

A job like this can REALLY make you thirsty!

 

 

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