The Dram Shop

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By in Events 0

Watch: Women’s World Cup, U.S. WNT vs. Nigeria

We will be airing the U.S. WNT vs Nigeria Soccer game at 6:00 pm! With a newly installed TV, we’ll cheer on USA as they try and secure the top spot in Group D. This will be the first of many events that we will air, including the upcoming Tour de France!

If you’re feeling hungry, The Pearl Restaurant right next door offers a special Pub Grub Menu in which you can call in an order and they will deliver it here. Market on Front also offers a yummy flat-bread menu. As always, feel free to bring in your own food, order a pizza or nosh on some of our in house snacks.

Go USA!!!

By in News, What's on Tap 0

Smurfs and Beer…Seriously!

This past March, The Mighty Mo Brewing Co. (in Great Falls, MT) held a homebrew contest, and the winner was a Smurf. Seriously. But it’s not quite that simple. The style of beer was a Belgian Saison—a beer brewed with belgian yeast and featuring funky, sweet, and peppery overtones. The beer was brewed by Missoula’s Clint Nissen, and he has his kids to thank for the name.

As he was trying to think up a name, his kids were watching The Smurfs cartoon. So he decided to google Smurf. It turned out to be a Belgian cartoon, and the Saison had a name.

The prize for winning the contest for Clint was to go into The Mighty Mo Brewing Company and brew a batch of ‘Smurf’ on their brewing System. With only 20 kegs available, we were thrilled when Clint called to see if we wanted to serve a keg of the Saison at The Dram Shop in Missoula so that we could give everybody a chance to give it a try.

We’ll be tapping the homebrew keg of Saison this Wednesday June 3rd! Come on by have a pint!

Check out the article in the Great Falls Tribune about the contest!

Beer and the Amazing BBQ

Summer is quickly approaching, and with it comes barbecue season. What could be better than spending some quality time in the backyard, grilling up some grub, and drinking some great beers! A challenge some folks face is finding a beer that is going to compliment their food nicely, but also be complex enough to enjoy on it’s own. Of course there are a lot different beer styles out there and literally thousands of different beers from different breweries Today, we’re going to focus on a range of somewhat malty beers, all the way to very dark beers. Don’t freak out hop heads, these beers taste so good with food, that you’ll be glad to put your IPA down for a little while. To limit our scope even further, we’re going to look at bottled beers that we have for sale here at the Dram Shop, just on the outside chance that you might want to swing by and pick one up before your next barbecue!

Piraat Belgian Pale: This Belgian beer is a rich and rounded brew. Deep golden with a subtle haze from lack of filtering, this beer will pair well with grilled salmon and vegetables. With lots of hops, malt, and a mild Belgian sweetness, Piraat will stand up to marinated and grilled chicken and pork as well. Look out for spices and tropical fruit s on the finish here.

Rodenbach Grand Cru: A blend of 1/3 young beer and 2/3 of beer aged 2 years in large oak vats, this beer is a very mellow Belgian sour. The proportion of oak matured beer contributes to complex and the intense, fruity taste. The finish is worthy of a great wine, making it a great pairing for just about anything you might choose to grill.

Ayinger Alt-Dunkel: Dark chocolate in color, you can see a wonderful reflection if you hold it up to the light. It is round and soft with the warm, sweet aroma of freshly roasted malted barley. This is great all around malty beer. With a satisfying, malty taste of toffee and a hint of plummy fruitiness in the finish, this beer compliment almost any marinade or smokey sauce.

Windmer/Deschutes Collaboration Alt Bitter aged in Bourbon Barrels: This beer is a blend of imperial barrel-aged versions of Deschutes Bachelor Bitter and Widmer Brothers’ Altbier. Imperial versions of both beers were blended together, then 50% was aged in rye whiskey barrels before blending back together again to create AltBitter. The subtle bourbon flavors blend with strong Malts and sit in the back when paired with Barbecue sauce and charred vegetables.

Full Sail – Bourbon Barrel Aged Imperial Stout: This year’s Bourbon Barrel Aged Stout is inky black with aroma of dried cherry, shaved chocolate, and whiskey. It has a full malty palate with flavors of dark chocolate, vanilla, cherry, dried figs and a subtle hint of molasses. It finishes warm on the palate and slow cooked or smoked meats will compliment this big Imperial Stout. Also, don’t overlook desert with a beer like this. A scoop of vanilla ice cream will mellow the big strong flavors present here.

Most of these beers are somewhat dry, full bodied, and flavorful enough to stand up to your favorite food off the grill without losing their very unique identities.

One last thing to note; one of the reasons that malty beers pair so well with the sweet, smoky flavors of barbeque is because they tend to have a somewhat dry mouth feel. So we say go ahead and see for yourself, throw some food on the grill, and crack one of these awesome beers!

Cheers!

 

By in What's on Tap 0

What’s on Tap!

We’re excited to feature our draught menu online!

HERE is a link to the over 35 beers, wine, cider and soda we have on tap. This is updated daily so you can always check to see what we’re pouring!

Next up, our bottle menu will be added too! We carry over 30 options of craft beer, cider (and non-alcoholic beverages) that you can enjoy in the shop or take with you. This list is growing day by day so keep your eyes peeled!

If you have requests for draft or bottled beer that you would like us to carry, please post to our Facebook page.

Cheers!

Beerposter

By in What's on Tap 0

How to Choose Your Next Beer

Okay, so here’s the situation: You finally managed to organize a group of friends to go out for drinks, and you’ve decided to try a new place with a large number of beers on tap (not going to name any names here). You arrive, and begin to peruse the menu, and there it is; that feeling of paralysis. There’s just too many choices, and you’re not sure what you’ll like. You don’t want to spend your hard earned cash on a beer that doesn’t add up.

Well, here’s some good news about your situation. Contrary to popular belief, craft beer is not snobby. If you’ve thought about bringing pretentiousness to the party you can leave it at home. The truth is, we love to talk about beer. And most people who enjoy craft beer love to talk about it too. All you really need is a starting point. Maybe it’s a beer you like, or a flavor you tasted that one time when you had that beer at your buddy’s BBQ. If you’re telling somebody who knows the beer selection well, chances are they can give you a few options that you’ll love.

The other great thing is that these days there are more and more options of different beers from different breweries, and they are almost all pushing the envelope on style. Basically, there’s never been a wider variety of high quality craft beer than there is right now.

It’ll help however to have a few terms handy, so let’s do a super quick fly by on brewing and beer classifications. Brewers are adding all kinds of crazy ingredients into some beers these days, but in it’s simplest form, there are four main ingredients in beer: water, yeast, grain, and hops. Different beers use different grains, and although barley is most widely used (most ales), wheat (think Hefeweizen and Witbier), and rye are also common. These grains are soaked in water and roasted, making sugars in the grain available. This is important because the yeast is going to be hungry, and it’s going to eat some of the sugars, producing both alcohol and carbonation, and also leaving some uneaten sugars that provide sweetness in the beer. I’ve heard it described as “yeast eats barley, farts beer.” Not the most eloquent description, but not all that inaccurate either.

Speaking of yeast, there are three main types:

  • Top Fermenting Yeast—Used for ales and ferment at higher temperatures.
  • Bottom Fermenting Yeast—Used for Lagers and Pilseners and ferment at lower temperatures.
  • Wild Yeast—Yeast and Bacteria present in the environment used for Belgians, Sours, and Lambics.

Lastly, but certainly not least, we have hops. Although historically used as much for a preservative as an agent*, the modern use of hops is all about flavor and aroma. Hops are added during the brewing process, adding bitterness to the beer and providing a counterpoint to the sweetness from the grains. Hops can also be added afterwards directly into fermenters in a process called dry hopping, which adds a strong hop flavor and aroma, while adding less bitterness to the beer.

We hope this gives you a general understanding of different beers. And remember, if you have any questions, want to compare and contrast some different styles, or just want to talk beer, come see us at the Shop!

*The popular IPA style which stands for ‘India Pale Ale’ are the hoppiest beers out there. This style was originally hopped so much so that the beer could make the trip by boat from Britain to India and not go bad along the way.

 

By in History 0

The Story of the Growler—”Rush the Growler!”

For a lot of folks these days the growler has become a ubiquitous part of life. Often times, the story goes something like this: You have a small herd of growlers roaming around somewhere between your kitchen and garage. You cull a couple from the herd here and there to take down to your local brewery or growler fill station and fill them to the brim with your favorite beverage. You take them home or on an adventure, and enjoy the libation within a few days. You try to remember to rinse them out when they’re empty. We emphasize the word ‘try’ here. Then, they probably roll around in the backseat of your car for a while before being returned to the herd. And the process can begin again…

That story may sound familiar, or maybe not, but the history of the growler in the U.S. has more in common with the way we use them now than you might think. And in many ways, The Dram Shop’s model is more similar historically to the way growlers were used originally in this country.

The use of growlers was, as is usual, a case of necessity being the mother of invention. It may be hard to believe, but there was a time in this country when beer was largely unavailable outside of a tavern or saloon. In the mid 1800’s, with the lack of pasteurization and modern bottling techniques, large scale bottling was practically non-existent. Bottles that were available were out of the price range of ordinary citizens. It sounds crazy, we know. And apparently folks back then thought so too, which is why growlers came to be used.

Growlers originally were buckets made of tin, glass, or pottery that would be brought to a tavern and filled on the spot. The growlers would then be taken to a job site or home, often times by a young men referred to as “bucket boys.”

The "Bucket Boys"

The “Bucket Boys”

The process of growler delivery was called “rushing the growler,” as most growlers had no lids and were to be consumed immediately. This began the tradition of a growler being for fresh beer. We like to think of them as a ‘mobile pitcher’.  Multiple growlers would be carried by hanging the handles on a pole. The pole would then be carried, moving 6-8 growler buckets at once.

Prohibition-rushing-lunch-growlers-beer-pails-1909

As the temperance movement that eventually brought about prohibition in 1920 gained speed, the act of filling growlers was outlawed in as many as twenty cities across the US. The proud tradition then lay dormant until it was revived by the modern craft beer industry in the late 1980’s.

So the next time you stop by The Dram Shop to fill a growler, and you don’t have time to stay for a cold one, just tell us you’d love to stay but you’ve got to “Rush the growler!”

Although we don’t sell tin buckets as growlers, we do sell a variety of glass, insulated and plastic growlers (for wine too!) to fit your needs. Here are our three different size amber glass growlers, and you can find more on our shop page. 

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Read more about The Dram Shop in the Missoulian’s Business Section and in the Missoula Independent’s recent “12 Things to Love About Missoula” (see #4)

By in Remodel 0

Open For Business!

As we rub the sleep out of our eyes on this Wednesday morning we suddenly realize, The Dram Shop is open!

These last weeks have been a blur of long days and nights, incredible hard work from friends and family, and of course frantic last minute preparations. In fact, we procured our Business License and Certificate of Occupancy around lunchtime on a Thursday, finally got our point-of-sale system set up at 2:30 p.m. and our private opening began at 4:00 p.m. Plenty of time to spare I kept telling myself.

And what has been the best part so far? It’s really hard to say, so maybe I should just stick with the laundry list approach. We’ve dealt with the shock of seeing our saw dust laden construction site go from filthy to beautiful almost overnight. And it turns out, you really can put lipstick on a pig. We’ve gotten to see reactions from friends, family, and colleagues as they see our place for the first time, which is just too much fun. We’ve had the pleasure of being on the receiving end of so many congratulatory messages, it’s overwhelming, but in that awesome way. But the most satisfying thing we’ve seen, is people coming through the front door, ordering a beer, and filling up a growler to take home with them. And it remains a bit hard to believe that we can already provide this service for folks. It seems like only yesterday we were trying to figure out what the best floor plan for our place would be.

Framing the cooler

Framing the cooler

Framing the bar

Framing the bar

Cabinets hung, bar top being built

Cabinets hung, bar top being built

Building shelves, pony walls, bench

Building shelves, pony walls, bench

In truth, there’s really far too many people to thank. We had so much help along the way, it’s really been a very humbling experience. So if you are one of those folks, we can’t really say how much we appreciate the support. And if you’re not one of those folks, well, come on by for a drink and we can fix that problem in a hurry!

Cheers!
Zach and Sarah

Hours:
Tuesday-Thursday 12-9 p.m.
Friday-Saturday 12-10 p.m.
Sunday 12-6 p.m.

 

By in News 0

Our first First Friday: Tom Robertson + The Pearl Pub Grub

This is our first First Friday at The Dram Shop! We’re excited to feature Tom Robertson’s photographs on our walls. We hung his show last week, leveling and straightening right up until the doors opened—making the space complete. Tom’s photos were taken across the Rockies, from Yellowstone to Fernie, and right here in Missoula’s own backyard.

Starting this Friday, we will also be offering a select menu from The Pearl Cafe, located right next door. You can order directly via phone from their special menu “Pub Grub” and they will deliver it to you at The Dram Shop!

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Tom’s bio: Tom Robertson is a freelance photographer, as well as an endurance athlete, outdoor enthusiast and avid adventurer based in Missoula. He especially loves incorporating his fitness with his work, keeping up with world-class athletes as he documents their endeavors. Tom has been recognized nationally and internationally for his projects throughout the United States and Europe. Clients include Saucony, Trek, The North Face, Runner’s WorldBicycling, and Adventure Cyclist

Here’s the sample menu from The Pearl Restaurant:

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 The Dram Shop is now open! Come visit us at 229 E. Front St. (between The Trailhead and The Pearl). Open Tues-Thur 12-9pm, Fri-Sat. 12-10pm, Sundays 12-6pm. 

 

 

 

By in Remodel 0

An Architect’s View

guest post by John Geurts, Project Lead, McNelis Architects

The Dram Shop, a growler fill station and taproom for lovers of craft brewing in downtown Missoula, Montana is well on the way to becoming a reality with the opening now less than two weeks away.

McNelis Architects, recently licensed to practice in the State of Montana, worked with proprietors Zach and Sarah Millar to capture their conceptual vision for a family friendly environment to showcase the well-established local micro brews as well as regional offerings.

Located in the historically designated 100-year-old Missoula Mercantile Warehouse Building, the design defers to the exposed 20 foot tall brick walls and fir timbers. McNelis Architects, with John Geurts as project lead, provided complete architectural, engineering, and interior design services from site selection and initial schematic design through construction management phases including documents for all permitting and construction. Interactive virtual walk-thru renderings and shop drawings were produced in house.

New simply detailed wood and colored surfaces introduce an inviting and engaging feeling into the airy space. Stainless steel and ceramic tile surfaces support the sanitary conditions at the back bar. The carefully designed lighting considerations illuminate the appealing variety of the liquid hues as well as the rotating gallery hangings on the surrounding wall surfaces. The new bar top itself showcases sustainable engineered laminate structural fir which enters a design dialog with the original fir floor.

Plans for future growth were incorporated in the design from the inception. In coming months, new folding glass doors will open and invite patrons to enjoy covered sidewalk seating in the Rocky Mountain air.

Before: Vacant tenant space when the lease was signed with members of the Millar family.

Before: Vacant tenant space when the lease was signed with members of the Millar family.

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Proposed view from the entry.

 

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Proposed view of the bar with 32 taps.

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Stud framing for the custom built walk-in-cooler complete with electrical work.

Insulation and drywall underway and cable suspended track lighting complete.

Insulation and drywall underway and cable suspended track lighting complete.

Wall painting in progress and cabinet delivery.

Wall painting in progress and cabinet delivery.

 Completed sheet flooring, and Levi installing the back bar base cabinetry.

Completed sheet flooring, and Levi installing the back bar base cabinetry.

Back bar and bar front installation.

Back bar and bar front installation.

Bar installation and setting the cask keg display case.

Bar installation and setting the cask keg display case with Damian Mast & Co.

Follow McNelis Architects on Facebook

 

By in Behind the Scenes 0

Taproom Dog

When I first started in the brewing industry better than a decade ago, I was hired at Big Sky Brewing Company to pour beers in their taproom. To this day I’m still not sure why they hired me. I was an out of work touring musician and had no experience at a brewery, in retail, or as a server. But, I did have a dog.

Her name was Kiska. She was as docile a Golden Retriever as you will ever meet. I mean, she was very sensitive. But, she loved people, and that made my new gig at the brewery a great fit for her. At the time, we lived in a tiny apartment on 5th Street in Missoula, about a mile and a half from the old Big Sky taproom on Hickory Street. Every morning we would walk along the river trail down to work, and Kiska would sit out in front of the brewery all day long. Every person who happened by was greeted with her same rabid enthusiasm, and it’s safe to say she put a smile on the faces of most folks. Now that I think about it, Big Sky may have hired me because of my dog.

kiskapuppy

Kiska by the Clark Fork River as a pup.

Fast forward a decade or more and a few things have changed. First off, Kiska unfortunately is no longer with us, and as of this last year, I’m no longer at Big Sky as I’m focusing my energies on starting up The Dram Shop. In the absence of Kiska, her friend and our other dog Leeroy now takes up the torch where she left off. Over the past months as I have sojourned each day to The Dram Shop on Front Street, Leeroy has faithfully joined me. We often walk home the couple of miles along Rattlesnake Creek and he loves to sniff around and wet his muzzle in the cold fresh water. He’s also taken up the tradition of keeping watch over the shop, and welcoming each person as they arrive.

A man's best friend.

A man’s best friend.

There’s something special about having a dog around. In some way it makes it all a bit more human, and I’m lucky to have him here by my side.