The Dram Shop

What’s on Tap

Maibock Week starts Saturday, May 20th !

All of the Maibock beers we’ll have on tap this week are for German Texans. What? German Texans you ask? That’s right folks, German Texans. The basic Bock style of beer, and granddaddy to the Maibock, was popularized in the Bavarian region of Germany in the 13th century. And Bavaria is big. Bavaria is so big that it’s been referred to as ‘The Texas of Germany’ dating back to at least the 1950’s. First brewed in the town of Einbeck, Bock beers got their name as the local dialect bastardized the name of the town into Ein Bock, meaning ‘Billy Goat’ in German. That’s why you always see goats on the labels of these German bock beers.

But we digress, as usual. Bocks are traditionally a celebratory beer, and hence they have a bit higher ABV, coming in around the 7-8% range. They won’t put you on your bottom immediately, but you’ll know you’re having a good time. Maibocks in particular feature a dry, and somewhat hopped finish. They are lightly malted, yellow to golden in color, with a medium mouthfeel. Often times you’ll taste notes of spice and pepper in this thirst quenching and flavorful spring offering.

We’ll be featuring 6 different Maibock beers all week. Come try a flight of all 6 for $15!

Here’s a list of Maibocks that we’ll have on tap at the shop all week long:

Hofbräu Maibock 7.2% ABV – Munich/Germany

Sierra Nevada Old Chico Pale Bock 6.8% ABV – 40 IBU – Chico/CA

Beaverhead Bock 6.6% ABV – 25 IBU Dillon/MT

Bayern Maibock 7.6% ABV – 28 IBU MIssoula/MT

Mighty Mo Hoki’s Maibock 6.3% ABV – 30 IBU Great Falls/MT

Laughing Dog Bock at the Moon 5.5% ABV – 30 IBU Coeur D’Alene/ID

Bozeman Brewing Super Power Solo Bock 7.2% ABV – 30 IBU Bozeman/MT

– Prost!

Missoula Craft Beer Week at The Dram!

Saturday, April 30th – Saturday, May 7th

Here are the events we have going at the shop for Craft Beer Week!

Sat. April 30th: All Day: Brews Cruise
We’re a stop on the bicycle ‘Poker Run’ that is the Brews Cruise. We are partnering with Great Burn Brewing and will have 4 of their beers on tap. We’ll be pouring flights of these 4 beers for just $5 all day. Folks will stop in throughout the day, get their Brews Cruise card stamped and have a beer! Click here for more details!

Tue. May 3rd 7 pm: Beer Geek Cage Match Trivia with Draught Works
We’re hosting a beer trivia night! Expect it to be packed. We’ll feature 4 Draught Works beers and have them on special for $3 per pint. We expect about 60 participants! Ryan Newhouse will MC. Prizes will be awarded for top finishers including tickets to the Garden City Brewfest and loads of beer swag! More details here.

Thur. May 5th 5pm-8pm: Downtown Mini Golf Tournament
Teams of competitors travel from place to place in Downtown Missoula playing a hole of mini golf at each venue. We will partner with Great Burn Brewing to host a hole at the Shop! We will feature two Great Burn Beers at $3 per pint as folks play mini golf throughout the evening.

Fri. May 6th 4:30 PM to Close: Great Northern Tap Takeover
Join us for a Tap Takeover at The Shop from 4:30pm to close! There will be tons of giveaways and good times. Buy a flight of 4 beers and get a free glass to take home. Featured beers: Bluebird Day Double IPA, Powder Ninja Porter, Good Medicine Strong Ale, and Wild Huckleberry. Help us celebrate Missoula Craft Beer Week! Check out more on the Facebook event here)

Click here for the entire Craft Beer Week Schedule!

Cheers Missoula!

 

Saison Week starts Sunday, April 17th!

Welcome to the month of April. Spring is in the air, and so is the Saison style of beer.

We’ll be featuring Saisons at the shop beginning Sunday, April 17th for a week.

We chose this style for April as it neatly fits in for this time of year. ‘Bier de Saison’ literally translates to ‘beer of the season’ and originally brewed by farmers in the French speaking part of Belgium. Saisons are commonly referred to as ‘farmhouse style ales’. What this means more generally, is that they were brewed with whatever ingredients were available down on the farm. The beer would be brewed at the end of winter, stored when it was still cool (as refrigeration was not available), and consumed during the warmer months. Farm workers in the fields were allotted up to 5 liters each day. We’re not sure how much work they actually got done, but at least they were happy. Moderate alcohol and thirst quenching on the palate. Traditionally Saisons have enjoyed a wide style description. In modern times however we can narrow our focus on these beers.

Here are some general characteristics:

Pale orange to golden in color, these beers are fruity and feature citrus flavors. Moderate hop presence gives way to pepper and/or clove flavors. Moderate maltiness marries into a light alcohol presence. A light to medium mouth feel enhances the fruit and spice flavors.

Feeling Thirsty yet??

Come join us all week to experience these unique beers!!!

6 American Saisons on tap all week. Flights of 3 or 6 will be available as well as pints. It’s farmhouse beer time!

Barleywine Week!

We’re winding up for our monthly style feature here at the shop, and this month, due to the final cold stretch of winter laid out before us, we’ve decided to feature barleywine. Starting Sunday, February 14th, we’ll be featuring 6 different varieties of barleywine. It’s a style that weighs in heavily when it comes to flavor and alcohol content. Large grain bills and generous hop additions lead to big ales, that can be as delicate and distinctive on the palate as fine wine. These ales are also fit for aging for multiple years.

This last fact seems fitting, as the first known references to barley wine date back to ancient Greece. Greek historian Xenophon (sweet name we know) makes mention of barley wine being stored and consumed on a regular basis. These earlier versions would be unlike modern barleywine however as the use of hops was not documented until centuries later. Something tells us these Greek versions were both big and funky.

Style wise, barleywine breaks down along English and American lines. As is somewhat standard in the craft beer world, American versions tend to be more aggressively hopped, while english versions rely on deep malting and more subtle balance. This leaves both versions at similar alcohol by volume percentages, but vast difference in flavor profile and visual appearance. English barleywines can be amber, to deep amber, even to very dark. American barleywines are usually honey colored or even lighter, with amber and red amber being on the dark end. They are all big beers, meant to warm in your glass as you sip slowly and let the burn of the alcohol settle in your stomach.

One more quick aside here, for those of you who like splitting hairs (a favorite pastime of ours)….Barley wine has traditionally been written as two words in britain, and dating all the way back to it’s origins. This makes sense linguistically if it is being described as a type of wine, with ‘barley’ as the qualifier. Legend has it that when Anchor Brewing Company brewed the first significant barleywine on American soil in 1976 (Old Foghorn it’s called), they decided to make it one single word, so that it would not be confused with wine made from grapes in the marketplace. We think it was a wise move, and for the record, we have decided editorially to side with our new world brethren and keep with the tradition. Ok, end of rant.

On that note, we’d like to introduce our starting lineup of barleywines, starting Feb. 14th:

Grand Teton – 2012 Oak Aged Barleywine: 
10.0% ABV – Victor/ID
Brimming with bold flavors of bittersweet malt and heaps of aggressive hops, this barleywine was part of Teton’s annual holiday ‘Coming Home’ series. It was aged in Oak for two years, and then has been aged in stainless since 2014. A rare treat indeed.

Bozone – Wee Nip Barleywine: 9.0% ABV – 100 IBU – Bozeman/MT
Wee Nip boast piney and citrusy hop aromas, and a subtle blend of three specialty malts keeping the beer in balance. A more conservative approach to the alcohol content keeps this brew a little more approachable than other big beers.

Stone – Old Gaurdian Barleywine: 11.2% ABV – 80 IBU – Escondido/CA
The maltiness of this beer is only tamed by a prodigious addition of hops, creating a rich, slightly sweet, ale infused with assertive bitterness and bright hop notes, all culminating in a pleasing dryness.

Rogue – New Crustacean Barlywine/IPA: 11.3% ABV – 88 IBU Newport/OR
Not quite a barley wine and not quite an imperial IPA. Featuring 8 Ingredients: Weyermann & Bohemian Malts; Bravo, Amarillo, Falconer’s Flight & Horizon Hops; Free Range Coastal Water & Pacman Yeast.

New Belgium – Blackberry Barleywine: 10.0% ABV – 50 IBU – Fort Collins/CO
Blackberry Barleywine channels the elegant spirit of a classic English barleywine, but with a kiss of blackberry. A deep wash of caramelized sugar and toasted bread, courtesy of Caramel Munich malts, adopts subtle laces of floral fruit for a proper pairing.

Moylans – Old Blarney Barleywine: 10.0% ABV – Navato/CA         
Our Barleywine Style Ale is a rich and heavy ale brewed to a high gravity. Massive body, mouthfeel and hoppiness. Barleywines are the “brandy” of the ale world. A great sipping ale, and a perfect finish to any meal.

Ask us about our flights too!

 

 

By in Events, What's on Tap 0

First Annual Stout Week! Jan. 17th-23rd

Our First Annual Stout week is coming up, and we thought we should write up a bit of an explainer on the history and origins of stout beers. First of all, we love the style. Stouts come in a wide variety, all of which are dark. But never fear, most are very approachable. The term stout originally meant a stronger version of any style of beer, and as darker beers gained traction, this was often times a Porter. This characterization of course has changed in the modern era to mean a specific family of very dark beers. Although folks can argue over whether or not there is really any difference between the Stout and Porter Families of beers, we plan on ignoring that cacophony, and diving straight into the world of Stout Beers!

Let’s review Styles:

Milk stout

Milk stout (also called sweet stout or cream stout), is a stout containing lactose, a sugar derived from milk. Because lactose is unfermentable by beer yeast, it adds sweetness, body, and calories to the finished beer. Historically people thought of milk stout as nutritious, and hence was given to nursing mothers.

Dry or Irish stout

With milk or sweet stout becoming the dominant stout in the UK in the early 20th century, it was mainly in Ireland that the non-sweet or standard stout was being made. As standard stout has a drier taste than the English and American sweet stouts, and they came to be called dry stout or Irish stout to differentiate them from stouts with added lactose or oatmeal. Though still sometimes termed Irish or dry stout, particularly if made in Ireland, this is the standard stout sold and would normally just be termed “stout”.

Oatmeal stout

Oatmeal stout is a stout with a proportion of oats, normally a maximum of 30% of the grain bill, added during the brewing process. Even though a larger proportion of oats in beer can lead to a bitter or astringent taste, during the medieval period in Europe, oats were a common ingredient in ale, and proportions up to 35% were standard.

There was a revival of interest in using oats during the end of the 19th century, when (supposedly) restorative, nourishing and invalid beers, such as the later milk stout, were popular, because of the association of porridge with health. Some oatmeal stout uses a minimal amount of oats. With such a small quantity of oats used, it could have had little impact on the flavor or texture of the beer. Oatmeal stouts do not usually taste specifically of oats. The smoothness of oatmeal stouts comes from the high content of proteins, lipids (includes fats and waxes), and gums imparted by the use of oats.

Chocolate stout

Chocolate stout is a name brewers sometimes give to certain stouts having a noticeable dark chocolate flavor through the use of darker, more aromatic malt; particularly chocolate malt—a malt that has been roasted or kilned until it acquires a chocolate color. Sometimes, the beers are also brewed with actual chocolate!

Oyster Stout

Oysters have had a long association with stout. When stouts were emerging in the 18th century, oysters were a commonplace food served in public houses and taverns. Modern oyster stouts may be made with a handful of oysters in the barrel. Others use the name with the implication that the beer would be suitable for drinking with oysters.

Imperial Stout

Imperial stout, also known as Russian imperial stout or imperial Russian stout, is a strong dark beer or stout in the style that was brewed in the 18th century. It has a high alcohol content, usually over 9% abv. This style is often aged in used Bourbon or Whisky barrels to imbue the beer with a mellow, boozy, flavor.

There you have it folks! Now, we’re bringing in some delightful stouts for our event. We are leaning towards heavier, darker, barrel aged stouts. These bigger stouts tend to present a depth of flavor profile that we really love. The big ones are served in a snifter, and are surely meant to be sipped rather than quaffed.

Here’s a list of beers we’ll have on tap:

Bourbon County – Brand Stout                                                            13.7% ABV –  60 IBU – Chicago/IL
$9 per 12 oz snifter

Brewed in honor of the 1000th batch at our original Clybourn brewpub. A liquid as dark and dense as a black hole with thick foam the color of a bourbon barrel. The nose is an intense mix of charred oak, chocolate, vanilla, caramel and smoke. One sip has more flavor than your average case of beer.

Sierra Nevada – Narwhal Imperial Stout                                     10.2% ABV – 60 IBU – Chico/CA
$6 per 12 oz snifter

Featuring incredible depth of malt flavor, rich with notes of espresso, baker’s cocoa, roasted grain and a light hint of smoke, Narwhal is a massive malt-forward monster. Aggressive but refined with a velvety smooth body and decadent finish.

Deschutes – Abyss Russian Imperial Stout                                    12.2% ABV – 86 IBU – Bend/OR
$8 per 12 oz snifter

A deep, dark Imperial Stout, The Abyss has almost immeasurable depth and complexity. Hints of molasses, licorice and other alluring flavors make it something not just to quaff, but contemplate.

Elysian – The Fix Choc. Coff. Imp. Stout                                      8.9% ABV – 55 IBU – Seattle/WA
$8 per 12 oz snifter

Dark, rich, and roasty with Stumptown coffee and aged on cocoa nibs sourced by Theo Chocolate, this stout is complex and full of your favorite dark matter.

Big Sky – Ivan the Terrible Imp. Stout                                        9.5% ABV – 39 IBU – Missoula/MT
$8 per 12 oz snifter

Ivan the Terrible Imperial Stout is Brewed according to the traditional style using English hops and the finest american malt. It’s aroma and flavor balance well between esters of dried fruit and roasted cocoa with a slight bourbon presence.

Grand Teton – Black Cauldron Imp. Stout                                        8.0% ABV – 47 IBU – Victor/ID
$8 per 12 oz snifter

This thick, rich ale was brewed with plenty of caramel and roasted malts, and subtly spiced with American Chinook and Willamette hops. It boasts flavors of chocolate and coffee, along with raisins and dried fruit soaked in sherry. We’ve accentuated the natural smokiness of the brew by adding a small amount of beech wood-smoked malt and aging the brew in an oak whiskey barrel, which also adds notes of oak and vanilla.

We will be offering Flights of all 6 stouts that we have on tap all week long.   

*Some beers will be restricted to no growler fills based on the limited quantity we are able to get!

 

By in Behind the Scenes, What's on Tap 0

What is Cask-Conditioned Beer?

Ever wonder what that sideways keg and crazy tangle of beer tubes is that you see at the front of The Dram Shop every weekend? Well, you’ve come to the right place! What we’ve got here is a bonafide explainer on what is called Cask Beer.

Cask case

Our Cask Case

Cask-Conditioned beer, which is unfiltered and unpasteurized, is served from a traditional cask without additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO2) pressure. What is a cask you ask? A cask is simply a term for a container that has been used dating back to Babylon in 424 BC, where there is reference to ‘casks of wine’. During the Iron Age, Northern European Celts developed wooden casks held together by a band of metal. This basic design is still used today, although most casks of beer are now stainless steel.

By the 17th Century, bottled beer was commonplace, although expensive. The bottles were mostly consumed by elites who eschewed the common pubs for their rowdy publicans and tumultuous environment. For commoners however, it was off to the pub for a bit of the pint, and the beer that was drunk came right off of a cask. As beer styles became lighter and lower in alcohol, it became more of a challenge to keep them preserved in a cask. Louis Pasteur’s sterilization coupled with more modern refrigeration methods certainly helped in warmer climates, but in many cooler parts of the north, traditional cask beer remained largely unchanged.

Okay, let’s back up for a minute and go over some of the things that make cask beer unique. A cask is quite a bit different from a keg. First off, there is no downtube ensuring every last drop is used. Casks are designed to capture yeast and other large particles in the bottom as the beer is poured off. Kegged beer is filtered, fined, or centrifuged, making this action superfluous. Secondly, kegs use ‘head pressure’ provided by CO2 being pushed onto the beer to force it out of the faucet.

Cask beer is served one of two ways. If the cask is on a counter or bar top, a spigot is used to simply let gravity fill the glass. If the cask is stored below, a ‘beer engine’ is used to suction the beer up and into a waiting glass. In this instance, casks would traditionally be kept in a cellar, remaining at 55 degrees, the traditional temperature that cask beer is served at. At The Dram Shop, we keep our casks in our cask case at the front of the shop, which is chilled down to our lovely 55 degrees.

So that mostly covers the hardware part. Next, let’s talk about the beer itself. By the 1970s, the majority of draught beer was artificially carbonated, pasteurized, and filtered. That means that the beer is brewed and fermented normally. Then, when the beer is ready, it is heated to 161 degrees, run through a filter that removes all of the large particle proteins and sugars, and force carbonated with CO2 to augment any shortcomings. You end up with a clean beer that has an extended shelf life before turning sour. In order to make cask beer, you would capture beer in a cask after primary fermentation. At this point additional yeast and sugar or some kind of sweetener are added for a secondary fermentation inside the cask. Finings are added to assist in the dropping out of the yeast as well. Often times brewers add adjuncts at this point, such as hops, fruit, or other flavor enhancing ingredients. All of these additions stay in the cask, making for a cloudy appearance and often times a bigger mouth feel and more complex flavor profile.

In 1973, The ‘Campaign For Real Ale’(CAMRA) was started and a movement back towards the roots of cask beer had begun in earnest. The qualifying definition is: “beer brewed from traditional ingredients, matured by secondary fermentations in the container from which it is dispensed, and served without the use of extraneous carbon dioxide.”

We love serving cask-conditioned beer at the shop and tap a new cask every Friday afternoon! The casks are from local brewers at Big Sky Brewing Co. and KettleHouse Brewing Co. We get to help come up with some crazy recipes that are fun to drink!

Tapping the cask

This Friday, we will be tapping a ‘Cherry-Chocolate Moose Drool’ that ought to be pretty delicious! Come see us this weekend and we’ll have fun trying some cask-conditioned beer together!    

 

 

By in News, What's on Tap 0

Smurfs and Beer…Seriously!

This past March, The Mighty Mo Brewing Co. (in Great Falls, MT) held a homebrew contest, and the winner was a Smurf. Seriously. But it’s not quite that simple. The style of beer was a Belgian Saison—a beer brewed with belgian yeast and featuring funky, sweet, and peppery overtones. The beer was brewed by Missoula’s Clint Nissen, and he has his kids to thank for the name.

As he was trying to think up a name, his kids were watching The Smurfs cartoon. So he decided to google Smurf. It turned out to be a Belgian cartoon, and the Saison had a name.

The prize for winning the contest for Clint was to go into The Mighty Mo Brewing Company and brew a batch of ‘Smurf’ on their brewing System. With only 20 kegs available, we were thrilled when Clint called to see if we wanted to serve a keg of the Saison at The Dram Shop in Missoula so that we could give everybody a chance to give it a try.

We’ll be tapping the homebrew keg of Saison this Wednesday June 3rd! Come on by have a pint!

Check out the article in the Great Falls Tribune about the contest!

Beer and the Amazing BBQ

Summer is quickly approaching, and with it comes barbecue season. What could be better than spending some quality time in the backyard, grilling up some grub, and drinking some great beers! A challenge some folks face is finding a beer that is going to compliment their food nicely, but also be complex enough to enjoy on it’s own. Of course there are a lot different beer styles out there and literally thousands of different beers from different breweries Today, we’re going to focus on a range of somewhat malty beers, all the way to very dark beers. Don’t freak out hop heads, these beers taste so good with food, that you’ll be glad to put your IPA down for a little while. To limit our scope even further, we’re going to look at bottled beers that we have for sale here at the Dram Shop, just on the outside chance that you might want to swing by and pick one up before your next barbecue!

Piraat Belgian Pale: This Belgian beer is a rich and rounded brew. Deep golden with a subtle haze from lack of filtering, this beer will pair well with grilled salmon and vegetables. With lots of hops, malt, and a mild Belgian sweetness, Piraat will stand up to marinated and grilled chicken and pork as well. Look out for spices and tropical fruit s on the finish here.

Rodenbach Grand Cru: A blend of 1/3 young beer and 2/3 of beer aged 2 years in large oak vats, this beer is a very mellow Belgian sour. The proportion of oak matured beer contributes to complex and the intense, fruity taste. The finish is worthy of a great wine, making it a great pairing for just about anything you might choose to grill.

Ayinger Alt-Dunkel: Dark chocolate in color, you can see a wonderful reflection if you hold it up to the light. It is round and soft with the warm, sweet aroma of freshly roasted malted barley. This is great all around malty beer. With a satisfying, malty taste of toffee and a hint of plummy fruitiness in the finish, this beer compliment almost any marinade or smokey sauce.

Windmer/Deschutes Collaboration Alt Bitter aged in Bourbon Barrels: This beer is a blend of imperial barrel-aged versions of Deschutes Bachelor Bitter and Widmer Brothers’ Altbier. Imperial versions of both beers were blended together, then 50% was aged in rye whiskey barrels before blending back together again to create AltBitter. The subtle bourbon flavors blend with strong Malts and sit in the back when paired with Barbecue sauce and charred vegetables.

Full Sail – Bourbon Barrel Aged Imperial Stout: This year’s Bourbon Barrel Aged Stout is inky black with aroma of dried cherry, shaved chocolate, and whiskey. It has a full malty palate with flavors of dark chocolate, vanilla, cherry, dried figs and a subtle hint of molasses. It finishes warm on the palate and slow cooked or smoked meats will compliment this big Imperial Stout. Also, don’t overlook desert with a beer like this. A scoop of vanilla ice cream will mellow the big strong flavors present here.

Most of these beers are somewhat dry, full bodied, and flavorful enough to stand up to your favorite food off the grill without losing their very unique identities.

One last thing to note; one of the reasons that malty beers pair so well with the sweet, smoky flavors of barbeque is because they tend to have a somewhat dry mouth feel. So we say go ahead and see for yourself, throw some food on the grill, and crack one of these awesome beers!

Cheers!

 

By in What's on Tap 0

What’s on Tap!

We’re excited to feature our draught menu online!

HERE is a link to the over 35 beers, wine, cider and soda we have on tap. This is updated daily so you can always check to see what we’re pouring!

Next up, our bottle menu will be added too! We carry over 30 options of craft beer, cider (and non-alcoholic beverages) that you can enjoy in the shop or take with you. This list is growing day by day so keep your eyes peeled!

If you have requests for draft or bottled beer that you would like us to carry, please post to our Facebook page.

Cheers!

Beerposter

By in What's on Tap 0

How to Choose Your Next Beer

Okay, so here’s the situation: You finally managed to organize a group of friends to go out for drinks, and you’ve decided to try a new place with a large number of beers on tap (not going to name any names here). You arrive, and begin to peruse the menu, and there it is; that feeling of paralysis. There’s just too many choices, and you’re not sure what you’ll like. You don’t want to spend your hard earned cash on a beer that doesn’t add up.

Well, here’s some good news about your situation. Contrary to popular belief, craft beer is not snobby. If you’ve thought about bringing pretentiousness to the party you can leave it at home. The truth is, we love to talk about beer. And most people who enjoy craft beer love to talk about it too. All you really need is a starting point. Maybe it’s a beer you like, or a flavor you tasted that one time when you had that beer at your buddy’s BBQ. If you’re telling somebody who knows the beer selection well, chances are they can give you a few options that you’ll love.

The other great thing is that these days there are more and more options of different beers from different breweries, and they are almost all pushing the envelope on style. Basically, there’s never been a wider variety of high quality craft beer than there is right now.

It’ll help however to have a few terms handy, so let’s do a super quick fly by on brewing and beer classifications. Brewers are adding all kinds of crazy ingredients into some beers these days, but in it’s simplest form, there are four main ingredients in beer: water, yeast, grain, and hops. Different beers use different grains, and although barley is most widely used (most ales), wheat (think Hefeweizen and Witbier), and rye are also common. These grains are soaked in water and roasted, making sugars in the grain available. This is important because the yeast is going to be hungry, and it’s going to eat some of the sugars, producing both alcohol and carbonation, and also leaving some uneaten sugars that provide sweetness in the beer. I’ve heard it described as “yeast eats barley, farts beer.” Not the most eloquent description, but not all that inaccurate either.

Speaking of yeast, there are three main types:

  • Top Fermenting Yeast—Used for ales and ferment at higher temperatures.
  • Bottom Fermenting Yeast—Used for Lagers and Pilseners and ferment at lower temperatures.
  • Wild Yeast—Yeast and Bacteria present in the environment used for Belgians, Sours, and Lambics.

Lastly, but certainly not least, we have hops. Although historically used as much for a preservative as an agent*, the modern use of hops is all about flavor and aroma. Hops are added during the brewing process, adding bitterness to the beer and providing a counterpoint to the sweetness from the grains. Hops can also be added afterwards directly into fermenters in a process called dry hopping, which adds a strong hop flavor and aroma, while adding less bitterness to the beer.

We hope this gives you a general understanding of different beers. And remember, if you have any questions, want to compare and contrast some different styles, or just want to talk beer, come see us at the Shop!

*The popular IPA style which stands for ‘India Pale Ale’ are the hoppiest beers out there. This style was originally hopped so much so that the beer could make the trip by boat from Britain to India and not go bad along the way.