The Dram Shop

events

Barleywine Week!

We’re winding up for our monthly style feature here at the shop, and this month, due to the final cold stretch of winter laid out before us, we’ve decided to feature barleywine. Starting Sunday, February 14th, we’ll be featuring 6 different varieties of barleywine. It’s a style that weighs in heavily when it comes to flavor and alcohol content. Large grain bills and generous hop additions lead to big ales, that can be as delicate and distinctive on the palate as fine wine. These ales are also fit for aging for multiple years.

This last fact seems fitting, as the first known references to barley wine date back to ancient Greece. Greek historian Xenophon (sweet name we know) makes mention of barley wine being stored and consumed on a regular basis. These earlier versions would be unlike modern barleywine however as the use of hops was not documented until centuries later. Something tells us these Greek versions were both big and funky.

Style wise, barleywine breaks down along English and American lines. As is somewhat standard in the craft beer world, American versions tend to be more aggressively hopped, while english versions rely on deep malting and more subtle balance. This leaves both versions at similar alcohol by volume percentages, but vast difference in flavor profile and visual appearance. English barleywines can be amber, to deep amber, even to very dark. American barleywines are usually honey colored or even lighter, with amber and red amber being on the dark end. They are all big beers, meant to warm in your glass as you sip slowly and let the burn of the alcohol settle in your stomach.

One more quick aside here, for those of you who like splitting hairs (a favorite pastime of ours)….Barley wine has traditionally been written as two words in britain, and dating all the way back to it’s origins. This makes sense linguistically if it is being described as a type of wine, with ‘barley’ as the qualifier. Legend has it that when Anchor Brewing Company brewed the first significant barleywine on American soil in 1976 (Old Foghorn it’s called), they decided to make it one single word, so that it would not be confused with wine made from grapes in the marketplace. We think it was a wise move, and for the record, we have decided editorially to side with our new world brethren and keep with the tradition. Ok, end of rant.

On that note, we’d like to introduce our starting lineup of barleywines, starting Feb. 14th:

Grand Teton – 2012 Oak Aged Barleywine: 
10.0% ABV – Victor/ID
Brimming with bold flavors of bittersweet malt and heaps of aggressive hops, this barleywine was part of Teton’s annual holiday ‘Coming Home’ series. It was aged in Oak for two years, and then has been aged in stainless since 2014. A rare treat indeed.

Bozone – Wee Nip Barleywine: 9.0% ABV – 100 IBU – Bozeman/MT
Wee Nip boast piney and citrusy hop aromas, and a subtle blend of three specialty malts keeping the beer in balance. A more conservative approach to the alcohol content keeps this brew a little more approachable than other big beers.

Stone – Old Gaurdian Barleywine: 11.2% ABV – 80 IBU – Escondido/CA
The maltiness of this beer is only tamed by a prodigious addition of hops, creating a rich, slightly sweet, ale infused with assertive bitterness and bright hop notes, all culminating in a pleasing dryness.

Rogue – New Crustacean Barlywine/IPA: 11.3% ABV – 88 IBU Newport/OR
Not quite a barley wine and not quite an imperial IPA. Featuring 8 Ingredients: Weyermann & Bohemian Malts; Bravo, Amarillo, Falconer’s Flight & Horizon Hops; Free Range Coastal Water & Pacman Yeast.

New Belgium – Blackberry Barleywine: 10.0% ABV – 50 IBU – Fort Collins/CO
Blackberry Barleywine channels the elegant spirit of a classic English barleywine, but with a kiss of blackberry. A deep wash of caramelized sugar and toasted bread, courtesy of Caramel Munich malts, adopts subtle laces of floral fruit for a proper pairing.

Moylans – Old Blarney Barleywine: 10.0% ABV – Navato/CA         
Our Barleywine Style Ale is a rich and heavy ale brewed to a high gravity. Massive body, mouthfeel and hoppiness. Barleywines are the “brandy” of the ale world. A great sipping ale, and a perfect finish to any meal.

Ask us about our flights too!

 

 

By in Events 0

1/2 Off Double Haul Recovery Ale for Runners!

Welcome Runners to the Missoula Marathon! Whether you’re just visiting or you’re a local, we hope you enjoy a weekend full of festive running events and all that Missoula has to offer! In honor of the marathon weekend, we’ve tapped a keg of Double Haul® Recovery Style Ale from KettleHouse Brewing Company. Bring your bib to the shop after your 5K, half marathon or full marathon race this weekend, and we’ll give you 1/2 off your Recovery Ale!

In case you’re wondering what they did to make this beer so helpful after a race, here is their description:

Double Haul® Recovery Style Ale

Disclaimer: This write up was made by a brewer, NOT a licensed physician and is only meant to discuss the potential health benefits of specific ingredients in this beer. As with any alcoholic drink, potential healthful benefits can only be reaped with moderate consumption. Please drink responsibly!

This beer is an unfiltered version of our award winning Double Haul® IPA which we crafted to make an after-marathon brew. It has a few extra ingredients to help the body recover after a long workout. We added some ginseng, orange peel, and sea salt. Here is a breakdown of some potential benefits of all the stuff that went into this hearty concoction.

Yeast– This is an unfiltered version of Double Haul® so it still has plenty of yeast floating around in it, as much as 10,000 cells/ milliliter. This gives the beer some body and a nice textured mouthfeel. These yeast cells are packed full of nutrients and vitamins, especially the B-complex vitamins. These yeast are dormant, but still living, which helps with the health of your intestinal biota. If you go into any health food store you can buy brewers yeast as a nutritional supplement, but we think this is a tastier way to get your vitamins.

Hops– In one word: Antioxidants. Hops are chock full of antioxidants, especially one called Xanthohumol which some studies suggest has powerful anti-cancer properties.

Water– Researchers at Granada University in Spain found this Nobel Prize-worthy discovery after months of testing 25 student subjects, who were asked to run on a treadmill in grueling temps (104degrees F) until they were as close to exhaustion as possible. Half were given water to drink, and the other half drank two pints of Spanish lager. Then the godly researchers measured their hydration levels, motor skills, and concentration ability. They determined that the beer drinkers had “slightly better” rehydration effects, which researchers attribute to sugars, salts, and bubbles in beer enhancing the body’s ability to absorb water. The carbohydrates in beer also help refill calorie deficits.

Ginseng– Ginseng is believed to be a good tonic that benefits one’s stamina and helps boost energy levels. It helps athletes use oxygen more effectively, and it is believed to regulate metabolism, which can increase energy levels. Consumption of ginseng can also help athletes lower their recovery time and reduce stress.

Orange peel– Just try running a marathon with scurvy. Aside from its historical uses, modern science is finding a multitude of benefits of vitamin C. From boosting your immune system, to improved endurance, to preventing heat stroke, this workhorse vitamin does it all.

Sea Salt– Running a marathon drains a lot out of your body, especially electrolytes. So we added a little sea salt to help replace what was lost. A natural blend of sodium, calcium and magnesium salts furnishes your body with these elements in just the right proportions.

We will be open at 10am on Sunday for the Missoula Marathon!